Jeremy Corbyn Was a Communist Spy

Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn has been a controversial player in British politics for decades. Back in the 1980s, when the anti-nuclear cause was at its peak, his strong left-wing views placed him in the anti-NATO movement, while his long-term contacts with Irish Republican Army terrorists made Corbyn a subject of interest to the Security Service, popularly known as MI5.

However, a disturbing new report in The Sun reveals that Corbyn was much more than just a left-wing activist in the 1980s—he was spying on his own country for the Warsaw Pact. Although The Sun is a tabloid and not always meticulous with details, this report is based on the files of Communist Czechoslovakia’s State Security, known as the StB. To its credit, after the Soviet empire fell, the Czech Republic made StB files accessible to researchers. The Corbyn report is one of many bombshells to emerge from the musty files of Prague’s former version of the KGB.

The files in question appear entirely legitimate, and for Corbyn they are damning. They reveal that in 1986, when he was a Labour Member of Parliament, Corbyn was approached by an StB officer masquerading as a diplomat in London by the name of Jan Dymic. They met in the House of Commons on November 25 of that year, along with the activists Tony Gilbert and Sandra Hodgson of the far-left Liberation movement, who facilitated the encounter. In espionage terms, Gilbert and Hodgson functioned as StB cut-outs.

Based on Dymic’s report, the meeting went well. He assessed Corbyn, who was known as a sharp critic of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and Britain’s close ties with the Americans, as “negative towards the USA, as well as the current politics of the Conservative government.” Corbyn was exactly the sort of rising Western politico that, in the 1980s, the KGB and its satellite partners like the StB were looking to work with.

Read the rest at The Observer …